Let’s Talk Bookish | March 2020

Hello, my wonderful and lovely friends!! I hope you’re having a great week.

Thank you so so much to everyone who wished me well last week! I’m feeling much better, and it helped so much to see your lovely messages 💚 Thank you!!

Some other stressful/exhausting/time-consuming things have been going on in my life and I completely forgot about posting this. I was wondering earlier “what’s tomorrow’s topic??” and then I was horrified to realize I hadn’t announced them yet. My bad! Sorry guys!!

Today I’ll be sharing with you the Let’s Talk Bookish topics for March 2020. If you’d like to take part, be sure to check out the official page here to get the featured image, and to see this month and all the past month’s topics.

I’d also highly appreciate it if you guys shared any topic ideas that you’d love to discuss! It makes things more interesting and more community-based to have topics coming in from others in the bookish community, and not just me choosing 4 topics that I want to discuss.

I’d like to thank Aria @ Book Nook Bits for suggesting a topic! If you’d like to suggest a topic, don’t hesitate to fill out the form below!!

March 6th: Controversial Blog Posts

Examples: What do you consider controversial? Have you ever written a controversial post? How did you feel and why did you do it? Do you think that speaking about controversies is important?

P.S. If you can’t make tomorrow’s post, that’s totally okay. It’s my fault, and I apologize for posting the topics super late!


March 13th: What Is Your Favorite Way of Reading a Book? (Aria @ Book Nook Bits)

Examples: Do you prefer e-books, physical hardcovers, paperbacks, etc.? Do you like to buy or borrow your books? What’s your favorite bookstore/library? If you’re a borrower, what are your thoughts on borrowing books? If you buy books, what are your thoughts on buying them?


March 20th: Banning Books: A Bookish Sin, or a Reasonable Act?

Examples: In some schools, books are banned for a variety of reasons (too vulgar, explicit, religious, etc.). Do you think this is fair? Should students be allowed to read what they want and be able to get it from their school library? In a more broad sense, how do you feel about books that have been “banned”? Do you think that it’s a crime to ban a book, no matter what it contains, or are there certain cases where it’s alright?


March 27th: Cancel Culture in the Bookish Community

Examples: Do you think that there is “cancel culture” in the bookish community? Should books or authors be “cancelled”? If so, under what circumstances? If not, then how do you think cancel culture should be stopped?


You don’t have to answer every question under the examples. You don’t even have to answer any of them if you don’t want to, but I’ve decided to include them as a guideline if you are unsure what to post regarding the topic.

Is there something about books or the book blogging community that you want to discuss? Do you know any controversies going in the community right now? Is there something you don’t want to discuss personally, but would love to see other’s opinions about? Please share your ideas in the form below, or you can use my Contact page!!

That’s it for today! I hope you enjoy discussing these topics! Please do share any ideas for future discussions in the form above! I’m working on a reading update, which will probably come before the Monthly Wrap-Up, so be on the lookout for that!

Until next time,

Let’s Talk Bookish – Toxicity in the Book Blogging Community

Good morning and welcome back guys!!!!

Yes, I know I disappeared and I should have let you know about the mini hiatus, but I didn’t think I would be gone for the whole week. Hopefully I will not disappear like this next week. Anyways, my college classes started and I wanted to just focus on getting a good start to the semester. I very much intended on writing this discussion but I didn’t have the time. However, you can still check back later to see everyone else’s lovely posts on the topic!!

I think my new posting schedule that I mentioned in my December Monthly Wrap-Up post is what I’m going to have to do after today. Not sure yet, but I’ll think about it over the weekend. In the mean time, here’s today’s LTB topic.


Let’s Talk Bookish is a weekly meme, created and hosted by me, where we discuss chosen topics, share our opinions, and spread the love by visiting each other’s posts.

Today’s topic is: Toxicity in the Book Blogging Community (suggested by Ruqs @ Many Things Bookish)

Thank you so much for the suggestion Ruqs!! This topic is so interesting, and I did have some things to say, but it’ll have to be on another day. But still, I would love to hear your thoughts in the comments!! Below are some questions that could serve as a guideline for you!

There is a big emphasis on reading a lot of books, and an unintentional pressure to post consistently and be different/unique in a world full of similar blogs. How does this affect you as a blogger/reader?

Do you sometimes feel afraid to talk about a certain topic because you fear backlash?

Do you think that sometimes, the community is a little unforgiving and maybe hypocritical when it comes to problematic books or authors?

Is the community toxic at times?

This Week’s Participants:

Ashlee @ Books Are 42 | Dani @ Literary Lion

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So what do you think? Is the community toxic at times? Do you sometimes want to just get away? Do you think that the community is sometimes hypocritical? How was your week? What are you reading? Chat with me in the comments below!

Let’s Talk Bookish – How Do You Deal With Problematic Books?

Hello, and welcome to another Let’s Talk Bookish post! Let’s Talk Bookish is a weekly meme, created and hosted by me, where we discuss chosen topics, share our opinions, and spread the love by visiting each other’s posts.

Today’s topic is: How do you deal with problematic books?

This post is already late, and I apologize for that. I’m going to make this brief, because I’m not really sure how I feel about problematic books, but I’d still love to hear your thoughts!

I feel like problematic books are kind of tricky. A good number of books probably have something that makes them slightly problematic, so it’s a little unavoidable. We can’t just not read any books, because one small portion is problematic.

I also don’t think that we should rate or review books based on that problematic part alone unless it happens virtually through-out the entire book. Sure, you can reduce your rating because of it, but if the rest of the book is good or well written, I think that you should mention that while also talking about what made it problematic.

I like Vicky’s idea to do it in pluses and minuses, reading a good book for every bad one, and keeping a balance between the two, but I feel like that’s not going to work for some people, like me. I probably wouldn’t notice if something was wrong in a book, unless it’s something I’m very aware of or have experienced (and I haven’t experienced much either so…).

Basically, I don’t know how to deal with problematic books, because I feel like I won’t recognize if something is problematic, until I read someone else’s review mentioning that it is. I also don’t think that we should absolutely condemn those kind of books, unless the whole book is harmful. If we only focus on the bad part, we’ll forget or not notice the good part which is not really fair for the author or the book. It all really depends on what happens, and how it is handled.

This Week’s Participants:

Jane @ Blogger Books | Literary Lion | Megan @ Megabunny Reads | Line @ First Line Reader | Aria @ Book Nook Bits

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What do you think? Have you read any books that are considered problematic? Did you notice it while you were reading or afterwards? How do you decide if something is problematic or not? Chat with me in the comments below!

Let’s Talk Bookish – Do bloggers/reviewers have to review every book they read?

Good morning, and welcome to Let’s Talk Bookish! Let’s Talk Bookish is a weekly meme, created and hosted by me, where we discuss chosen topics, share our opinions, and spread the love by visiting each other’s posts.

Today’s topic is: Do bloggers/reviewers have to review every book they read? (submitted by Heran @ Be Frisky)

Like with most of the questions, no, you are not forced to do anything that you don’t want to, and you don’t have to review every single book that you read. However, I feel like there is an expectation for bloggers/reviewers to review every book that they read.

To me, there seems to be an expectation that if a blogger is reading a book, he or she is going to review it. So some people might say that they look forward to a review of that book. Of course, I’m pretty sure no one intends to pressure the blogger/reviewer into reviewing the book, but for me, it kind of feels like I have to do so, because somebody is looking forward to my review.

And I’m not complaining. I actually don’t mind when someone says they are looking forward to a review, because most of the time, my plan is to review the book anyway. I even mention that I’m excited for a review of a book someone else is reading with other people too.

But, I feel like it may be overwhelming, or unintentionally pressuring for the blogger/reviewer when I say that.

Reviews can be exhausting to write. Especially for those who write the super long and detailed ones. One day, you might just feel like “nah, I don’t want to review this” but then someone comes along, and says they are excited to read your review when you are done. And despite your declaration five minutes earlier that you were not going to review the book, you find yourself sitting for an hour or two gathering your thoughts so that you can write the review.

To answer the question: No, you don’t have to review every book you read.

But maybe we are unknowingly placing the expectation on ourselves and on others that we have to review every book that we read.

This Week’s Participants:

Evelyn @ Evelyn Reads | Megan @ Megabunny Reads | Kelly @ Books on the Brain | Shan @ Shanshelves | Heran @ Be Frisky | Jane @ Blogger Books | Aria @ Book Nook Bits | Katie @ Melting Pages


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What do you think? Have you ever felt like you had to write a review because someone said they were excited to see it? Do you think it’s wrong to say that you’re looking forward to someone’s review if they haven’t said that they plan on reviewing it? How long does it take you to write a review? Chat with me in the comments below!

Let’s Talk Bookish – Are TBRs necessary to be a reader?

Hello my friends and welcome back!! As you already know, it’s time for Let’s Talk Bookish. Let’s Talk Bookish is a weekly meme, created and hosted by me, where we discuss chosen topics, share our opinions, and spread the love by visiting each other’s posts.

Today’s topic is: Are TBRs necessary to be considered a book blogger, or reader? (suggested by Heran @ Be Frisky)

Many thanks to Heran for suggesting!! This is definitely an interesting topic because I thought that everybody had a TBR, and that it was one of those things that you just had to have as a reader.

First off, obviously no. You don’t have to have a to-be-read shelf, or list. There are benefits to having one, but nobody can force you, or say that you are not a reader if you don’t have a TBR. It’s simple: live, and let live guys.

Are there pros to having a TBR? Yes. Definitely.

They can help you keep track of all the books that have piqued your interest and give you a wide selection when you aren’t sure what to pick up next. It’s also kind of important sometimes when you’re doing tags, or TBR posts, or whatever, and the question asks you to find xyz in books from your TBR.

Are there cons to having a TBR? Yes. Absolutely.

This seems to be a problem for a lot of people. They add A LOT of books (think several hundreds, and thousands) to their TBR, and they really do want to read all of these, and then they have this mountain of books that probably sticks out into the great Milky Way. This can either discourage them and they never plow through it, or they actually push through and start making headway. But then a new book comes out, and they have to read it, and a friend recommends another book here, and you get another ARC there, and they end up back at square one.

It’s a blessing. And a curse.

In conclusion, if you don’t want to have a TBR, that is your choice, and people should respect it, and it doesn’t mean that you are not a reader or blogger.

This Week’s Participants:

Line @ First Line Reader | Jane @ Blogger Books | Aria @ Book Nook Bits | Vicki @ Diverse Fantasy Reads | Evelyn @ Evelyn Reads

That’s it for this Friday! You can expect a post sometime this Sunday with November’s topics, and it will also be available on the Let’s Talk Bookish page.

Do you have a TBR and how many books are on it? Do you plan on actually pushing through and reading all the books on there? Do you think TBR’s are necessary? How was your week? Chat with me in the comments below!